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times" about growing up with their single moms in mississippi and making the tough choice to go off to harvard and yale. yes, for them it was a very different choice than it is for most students. it wasn't an easy thing to do. you'll hear their stories coming up. go anywhere in the world, but you had to leave right now, would you go? man: 'oh i can't go tonight' woman: 'i can't.' hero : that's what expedia asked me. host: book the flight but you have to go right now. hero: (laughs) and i just go? this is for real right? this is for real? i always said one day i'd go to china, just never thought it'd be today. anncr: we're giving away a trip every day. download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please
picky about where it breeds. >> all 100 of those frogs are here, in mississippi. >> it was only one breeding pond known to exist, which was in harrison county, mississippi, and it had not been seen in louisiana since 1967. people kind of laughed, that frog is way over in mississippi, they've seen him, how did he swim across three rivers, cross three interstates and end up over here. >> the designated land in louisiana is privately owned and has been in one family for generations. >> it's land that my family has owned for well over 100 jeers, it's an actively managed tree farm. my great grandfather started a lumber company after the civil war. he built a lumber railroad in these areas in order to bring the timber down. we are standing right now in the middle of an area of about 1500 acres the fish and wildlife service has certified is a critical habitat for frogs that have not been here for many, many years, the frogs need certain elements to live. one of them is a pond. the fish and wildlife service says this is one of these ponds. now it renders his land worthless to potential deve
and mississippi. notice toward the mid-atlantic, the moisture and chance for showers, nothing like the south. either way, the clouds are moving in. heavy rain toward texas. still raining in the southeast. we are talking about the combination bringing eight inches of rain that have been soaked. >> the rain is really stuck there in the southeast. >> this unbelievable amount of rain. this summer, we have seen way over, 10 to 15 inches over. >> how many inches of rain have they seen? >> every place is different but some ten to 15. >> thank you. >>> kind of good news/bad news. it's a deal for the believers convinced we are not alone on the universe. do you believe this? >> yeah. >> the cia is officially acknowledging the existence of super secret area 51. the documents include a map of the location in the nevada desert. would you go, berman? >> mm-hmm. >> you would? >> mm-hmm. >> they said it's a testing sight for surveillance during the cold war. >> you believe that? >> i do. >> if they are not doing the alien autopsies there, where are they doing them? they are doing them somewhere? >> yeah. i'
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
mississippi on sunday turning roads into rivers. flooding has not been this bad since hurricane katrina in 2005. >>> in england, outrage grows after the partner of newspaper reporter glenn greenwald is detained under a uk terrorism act. david miranda was released after nine hours of questioning. this is according to "guardian" newspaper. no charges were filed but cell phone and other items were confiscated. greenwald works for the guardian newspaper and broke the story of the secret surveillance programs in the united states. >>> in other news, a new week of trading on wall street and stocks are expected to open flat. investors take a breath following two weeks of losses. ringing the opening bell this morning, representatives from american corporate profits. there they are, just about to ring the bell. >>> one-on-one with the future king. prince william sat down with max foster opening up about parenthood for the first time since the birth of his son, george. of course, the prince talked about that moment he walked out of the hospital with his wife and his son to that incredible media f
of the time in which you were raised. i was raised in the '60s and -- >> in mississippi. >> yeah, and i'm a -- not only that a student of my history. i've said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word, i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people i'm connected to, my ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who've come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> i understand lee daniels said that he used to use the word, and you two had a discussion -- >> i said lee, you ain't going to be using that word around me. lee, no you're not going to use that word around me. and i think it's used appropriately in the film. i mean, i thi
to leave mississippi in the 1960s to get married. how do you think it affected you the idea that your parent's marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> i tried to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. i stand on ground once hollowed by -- >> she won a pulitzer prize in 2007. about a forgotten union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know that it is our duty now to keep white men as would be masters. >> she wrote that poem and would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> and now that i do it i can't see it so clearly but i have faith that it is there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead in a world that doesn't always value that. >> trying to find a way to say what seems so necessary to be said but so difficult also to someone that i can speak intimately to. across time and space on the page that is thrilling to me. >> this summer the library of congress appointed her to a second term. but her time in washington is coming to a
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
to him happened in mississippi in 195 5. he was 14. a lot of people see this film and think about our new cycle stand your ground and stop and frisk and trayvon martin and brings up that talking point is there justice right now? really great part in the film where they talk about, you know, the young seizele gaicecil gain. he is saying the law was against us and not on our side. i think trayvon martin's family and other people would feel that way today. >> "the butler" takes a look at the inner workings at the white house in the past. we know oprah has modern day ties to this white house, the obama administration. listen to this. >> look at all of those administrations compared to obama. i mean, obama will stand alone because of what that represented for the country. i was so pleased that during the process of this interview, a white reporter sitting in the very chair you're sitting in saying he didn't realize until seeing this movie the depth of the importance of obama, but seeing that movie in the context of the civil rights movement, now allows him to see, wow, that is really bigger th
, minnesota, minnesota, georgia, florida. i point out mississippi, minnesota, georgia, and florida. we know the stereotypes that probably are quite true when you look at the food culture of some of those southern states. >> the southeast does struggle. i come from a long line of obesity. i think the real message is it doesn't matter where you live. it doesn't matter if your mother, grandmother, father, aunts, uncles, in my case, they're all obese. that doesn't mean i have to be obese. we're seeing a transition. >> so preschool the study was followed preschoolers. that is such a smart move. that's where it has to happen. >> i want to read the first lady's response to the numbers. she says today's announcement reaffirms my belief that together we are making a real difference in helping kids across the country get a healthier start to life. i see it as a balance of kids. you can play the video games but you can go on your bike. >>> i know it's not always easy to nurse. it was tricky. i had a lifestyle that made it doable for me. so i hope that i'm so glad to see more women nursing. i'm so glad
? your answer, just two. iowa and mississippi. hat tip to our friend jonathan martin at the "new york times" for that factoid. congratulations, by the way. today's winner jamie. trivia suggestion to "the daily rundown"@msnbc.com. we'll be right back. announcer ] made just a little sweeter... because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. >>> we're back now with more of the daily rundown. you heard it from mike and brad the fight over health care will be driving a lot of the conversation as soon as congress gets back to work. we learned today the obama administration is delaying another portion of the president's signature health care reform act a piece of the law that limits out of pocket costs meaning how much of their own money individuals could be forced to spend on health care another grace period before that part of the obama care would go into effect. joining us is our gaggle. karen and ann and kristen is with us. ann, ask you first. the delay comes afte
.s. senate. the answer is seven beginning in 1870 with rebels of mississippi. this year marked the first time that two ochls servafrican-amer simultaneously served in the senate and if cory booker wins next month, two african-americans together in the senate. lee is the winner! send your suggestions at msnbc.com. we will be right back. ♪ you don't have the time to hang around ♪ ♪ [ whimpers ] - hugs from beneful baked delights... - [ barks ] are crispy, oven-baked dog snacks with soft savory centers, made with beef and cheese. beneful baked delights: a unique collection of four snacks... to help spark play in your day. because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities.. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfect
mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the '60s to get married. >> how did it affect you, the idea that your parents' marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> that's the moment where i really tried in the language of poetry to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. white marble on confederate avenue. i stand on ground once hallowed by a web of -- >> one of the themes of her work is memory. what gets left out of the nation's public record. she won a pulitzer prize in 2007 for native guard. about a forgotten black union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know it is our duty now to keep white men as prisoners. rebel soldiers. would-be masters. >> she wrote that poem in the library's reading room in seat 170. sometimes to rest her eyes, she would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> now when i do it, i can't see the word poetry so clearly. but i have faith that it's there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead. for a
rate. in fact, only five states have a higher one. nevada, illinois, mississippi, rhode island and north carolina. pretty stunning. by the way, christie has kept a football field's worth of distance between himself and controversial gop senate nominee. but finally decide to endorse him at an event on tuesday. the first and last time chris christie probably campaigning with him. washington chief correspondent dan balls. and political eder to for the degreo.com harry bacon jr. and liz showny from the associated press. mr. balls, we have dined out on candidates starting presidential campaigns early for decades. in some ways, we love it as political junkies. what's surprising is when front-runners who don't need to do it dip in too early. hillary clinton, dipping too fast? >> i'm not sure. i think you're right. part of this is driven by us. >> doesn't take much to feed -- >> our april tied petite to get next campaign grows so that's part of it. the other is could she avoid it anyway? she's being drawn into the conversation in a sense whether she contributes to it or not. the fact t
was assassinated in his own driveway in mississippi. we were a very different country. the original march on washington for jobs and freedom which took place august 28, 1963 was a call to action, not just to citizens of all colors who were concerned about civil rights but to politicians. in fact, the original march was mainly directed at little leaders in congress and in the white house to follow through on president kennedy's push for a civil rights bill which passed the following year. 50 years later, the supreme court's conservative majority including its lone black member have gutted the voting rights act passed two years after the march in 1965. states are rolling back access to health care for women and the working class. it's under constant attack. we are a different country but still have a fight 0 our hands. so when you watch the coverage commemorating the march remember the call to action is political because it always has been. thanks so much for watching. "hardball" with chris matthews is next. >>> hillary's ahead of schedule but who is driving the bus? let's play "hardball."
of mississippi. meredith integrated ole miss back in 1962, becoming the first black student to enroll at the all-white university in the heart of the deep south. segregation is rioted on his first day in campus, forcing president kennedy to send in the national guard to restore order. but james meredith would go on to graduate and continue to advocate for civil rights. his courage is an example to all of us. we're celebrating that kind of courage this friday in a special edition of "politics nation" covering the march on washington 50 years later. joining me, martin luther king iii and congressman john lewis as we look back on dr. king's dream and look ahead to the work yet to be done. it's all on the night before the march on washington that i'll lead with martin luther king iii. we hope you'll tune into that show and join us for the march. yeah? then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. silence. are you in good hands? apply cold therapy in the first 24 hours. but not just any cold. i only use new ther
problems. this hatch -- this happened on sunday engulf port, mississippi. storm hit during a church service. the rain fell so much worshippers became stranded in the church. 6 inches of rain falling in two hours there. the bishop says the property has drainage problems. only time the flooding was worse was during hurricane katrina. whoa. my. likely to be more flooding there today. there will also be heavy rain across the southeast into the mid-atlantic states. clear in the northeast across the midwest and plains. showers in the southwest and rockies. >> 97 degrees in denver. colorado springs. warming up in new york. haven't seen 86 here in weeks. 76, seattle. 90 minneapolis. miami. 109 degrees of dry, pizza oven heat in phoenix. >> the pet population at the white house is increasing by one. the first family has welcomed a second dog. her name is sunny, a portuguese water dog. >> same breed as bo, the obama's first dog. the white house says -- the breed works well for the obamas because of family allergies. sunny is entirely black, bo has a couple white spots down the middle and on paws. as
. but across the states of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, and texas, maybe not. >> we're going to stop you for not having a gun. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: there you go. exactly. yeah, i guess that's -- you know, that's a state by state issue, chris. >> it is. >> stephanie: killed an unarmed teenager -- all right. okay. daryle in mobile -- >> caller: [ inaudible ] mobile, stephfy. >> stephanie: hi daryle go ahead. >> caller: i was doing 80 and a black guy got ahead of me speeding, and i got pulled over, and i had my police t-shirt on, and i had my weapon on my side. he said okay. i need your license and registration. but he did give me a ticket. >> stephanie: yikes. yeah, interesting. interesting. i guess you are not quite as awesome as george zimmerman. >> caller: i guess not. when i seen that on the news. i said, wow, what a break. >> stephanie: yeah, you are not quite as white looking as george zimmerman. maybe that's what it is. >> wow. >> stephanie: just yet another incredible story, how about incredible that awesome -- >> he's so awesome. >> stephanie: right. he is just g
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
is white. other mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the 1960s to get married. how do you think it affected you the idea that your parent's marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> i tried to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. i stand on ground once hollowed by -- >> she won a pulitzer prize in 2007. about a forgotten union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know that it is our duty now to keep white men as would be masters. >> she wrote that poem and would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> and now that i do it i can't see it so clearly but i have faith that it is there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead in a world that doesn't always value that. >> trying to find a way to say what seems so necessary to be said but so difficult also to someone that i can speak intimately to. across time and space on the page that is thrilling to me. >> this summer the library of congress appointed her to a second term. but he
opportunity. let me conclude with this. generations, if this is 20th-century mississippi -- or 20th-century mali, young people have risked their safety and given their lives to give the -- get the education that has opened their potential. she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear. we want school and education for will child, and we continue the journey to our destination of these and education. nobody can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change to our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service and your commitment, your creativity and courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no more >> to fall through, no more barriers to run into and no more threats to their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. if you want peace, work for justice, it has been said. we know this cuts to the root of if we wantallenge -- justice and peace, we must work for education. thank you so much, and i am happy to take your questions. [applause] >> is that working? mayb
will show you pictures, this is gulfport, mississippi. six inches of rain fell alone there yesterday. you can see flooding the streets, stranding so many drivers. flood watches and warnings are in place all the way from the florida panhandle northward to the carolinas. people trying to leave a church in gulfport either had to wade through the waist-deep water or wait for it to recede. south florida, rip currents very, very dangerous. police report 50 rescues. in fact, an elderly couple drowned. >>> families are being told to get out as this incredibly dangerous wildfire scorches the community of sun valley, idaho. the fire has grown to more than 100,000 acres. much of this part of the country home to a lot of pricey property. you have actor tom hanks, bruce willis, they have places there. then the fire crews, 1200 firefighters working tirelessly to gain ground on the flames, trying to save the thousands of homes still in this fire's path. academy award winning actor richard dreyfuss is among those expressing gratitude to the fire crews. this was his tweet. the beaver creek fire is ravagin
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
was in the march. i was in the mississippi delta when i got a call from friends who say bayard said if you want to work on the march, it's going to happen. get yourself on to a plane and come to new york. and that's how i got to be on the staff of the march. one of the seminole experiences of my lich. >> 50 years ago today. we'll return to today's commemoration of the march later in the show. >>> president obama to do something about the horrifying carnage in syria. anything he can do? a live report is next. can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. yo
in remote, western kentucky. it's right near the mississippi river in that little part of kentucky that abuts missouri and it's in a town of like 400 people and the candidates come and just the audience heckles them and things get thrown on the stage. i found a story from 1995 and two candidates from secretary of state in kk centucky. his father chants fbi, fbi during a speech. almost a fight, they had to hold him back. that's what's going on in coycoid tco kentucky today. i wonder, rick, we talk about mitch mcconnell last segment. what are kentucky voters going to be see from mitch mcconnell over the next year? >> people underestimate him because he has a soft kind of effect and this guy is not going to play a round and he's not going to take any -- there's not going to be any slack for either allison grimes or his republican opponent. this is a guy who goes for the throat and he's not going to screw around and i think you're going to see he has three things going for him. he has resources and he'll spend them, he'll spend them early, that works. an early understanding of the stat
southern strategy, of ronald reagan's infamous trip to philadelphia, mississippi, now to the dismantling of the voting rights act and restricting voting laws we're seeing. is it disappointing that republicans weren't part of the march on washington anniversary? of course it was. but is it a surprise? not really. it's the story of the last 50 years. real football fans love a good snowball. if you are the governor of the state hosting the first outdoor cold weather super bowl ever, are you really supposed to say that's what you are hoping for? we'll tackle that next. we believe it can be the most valuable real estate on earth. ♪ that's why we designed the subaru forester from the back seat forward. the intelligently designed, responsibly built, completely restyled subaru forester. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. and this park is the inside of your body. you see the special psyllium fiber in metamucil actually gels to trap and remove some waste. and that gelling also helps to lower some cholesterol. it even traps some carbs to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels as part of
the storm troopers of the movement. they went into the mississippi delta, where other organizations were afraid to go. and out of the mississippi delta, a sharecropping family. by her own account, went to school only one date in her entire life. i would argue she was one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. the speech that she gave the democratic national convention in 1964, you can youtube it. if you have not heard it, hear it. it is one of the most eloquent statements i've heard. a courageous woman. but again, if we move from the national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of the most exciting things about being involved in the scholarly production of the civil rights movement, we have a lot of really good stuff that is coming up that is talking about these local activists who are anonymous for the most part with a national movement. and if we go back to where we are today clearly, we are at a place where we have to think of very local terms the action is going to be at the state level. living in kansas, i would argue kansas is a laborat
or in mississippi or in illinois or in california. across this country, people are demanding comprehensive immigration reform, and the end of the deportations of the direction of our families -- destruction of the family. someone in the -- i was in minneapolis-saint paul. the church was full. she bemoaned the fact that more people didn't come. they didn't come. and some were tired and frustrated and they were disillusioned. guess what? virginia is giving the example today no one has a right to be tired. [cheering and applause] nobody has a right to be disillusioned. nobody has a right to give up on this fight. because today 1,200 people will be deported. hundreds of children will be left without a poem -- mom or a dad. without husband or wife. the fear that permeates our community and the underclass that exploited every day has to come to an end. you don't are -- have a right to be tired. you have a responsibility to fight and make it a greater and better nation for us to live. virginia today is giving that example. thank you so much. [applause] [cheering and applause] [inaudible] [speakin
with this. for generations, 20th century mississippi here on 21st century somali. they have risked their safety and given their live to get the education that will unlock their full potential. it from the podium, she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear, we want schools and education for every child's bright future. we will continue our journey to our destination of peace and education. no one can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change through our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service, your commitment, your creativity, and your courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no cracks for students to fall through. no more barriers to run in to. and no more threat of their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. it's been said that if you want peace, wok for justice. we know that one solution cuts to the root, cuts to the very heart of the challenges con flingting our collective humanity. if we want both justice and peace we must work for educa
answer. quinn: yes. one. gloments thompson: no. >>this season? thompson: no. in mississippi. >> no time for baseball this year, sadly. weiner: no , sir. john liu, should there be more surveillance camera in our city. >> yes. quinn: yes. thompson: yes. liu: yes. >> no. albanese: yes. >> moderator: have you ever texted while driving? [laughter] quinn: no. thompson: [whistling] yes, i have. i have stopped doing it. glel i have a driver. [laughter] that's a good answer. my wife is sitting in the front row. if i would said no. yes, i have sinned. i have stopped now. weiner: yes. [laughter] [laughter] [laughter] tough act to follow. [laughter] thompson: no. i have but i have never smoked pot. [laughter] >> moderator: do you have a men to card in your pocket? thompson: yes. >> yes. weiner: -- [inaudible] albanese: yes. liu: yeah, i have mine too. pocket or purse? quinn: pocketbook. >> moderator: have you ever taken a bus or subway without paying? albanese: no. >> no. >> no. >> no. >> yes, but i have my school bus pass. [laughter] quinn: no. >> no. >> moderator: if you are elected, will you li
of the mississippi is brewed here in milwaukee. i am appreciative of that. note, in addition to wishing all of you safe travels, most of you will fly out of general mitchell international airport which is just a few minutes down the way. i will be departing to go just a couple minutes south of that. a suburb of milwaukee. on august 5 of last year, a year from tomorrow, we lost lives at that sikh temple and today we will be memorializing those six lives. i appreciate those who reached out, i appreciate that. but we are not just going to be met -- remembering the lives of our loss. in a real sense, we will be celebrating the unity i saw not just from the members of that temple but the larger camepolitan community that together and supported them. the shining example they have wisconsinll of us in -- the old adage that martin luther king did, hatred does not drive out hatred, only love does. we certainly saw that in the sikh community and they inspired us all. we will depart -- will be departing for that in a little bit. >> i am pleased if you could pass on to your whole team of volunteers and everyo
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)